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Upcoming Undergraduate Course Schedule & Descriptions


DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OFFERINGS

SPRING 2015



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Language Courses
Advanced Language Courses
Core Courses
Senior Seminars
French Electives
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LANGUAGE COURSES

Information on placement into language courses can be found HERE.  In addition, CAS's schedule of exams are available HERE.

FREN-UA 1
Elementary French I

Open to students with no previous training in French.  Not equivalent to FREN-UA 10.  Only by following FREN-UA 1 with FREN-UA 2 can a student complete the equivalent of FREN-UA 10 and then continue on to the intermediate level.

Waverly 566B (sec. 1), 570 (sec. 2); Silver 510 (sec. 3 & 4), 402 (sec. 5 & 6), 500 (sec. 7)
Section 001: MWR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9967) – Delphine Stafford
Section 002: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9968) – Kaliane Ung
Section 003: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9969) – Jean-Pierre Graff
Section 004: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9970) – Jean-Pierre Graff
Section 005: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9971) – Amelia Fedo
Section 006: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9972) – Downing Bray
Section 007: TR, 2:00pm – 4:00pm (#22286) – Fatiha Bali
    Section 007 is exclusively for Tisch School of the Arts students and is only availble for students who have received permission from the Department of French.

FREN-UA 2
Elementary French II

Continuation of FREN-UA 1.  To continue on to the intermediate level, a student must complete both FREN-UA 1 and FREN-UA 2.  This two-semester sequence is equivalent to FREN-UA 10.

Waverly 429 (sec. 1 & 2), 412 (sec. 3), 512 (sec. 4 & 7), 504 (sec. 5), 510 (sec. 6), 566B (sec. 8);
Silver 406 (sec. 9)
Section 001: MWR, 8:00am – 9:30am (#9973) – Lauren Weaver
Section 002: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9974) – Camilo Frias
Section 003: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9975) – Bassem Shahin
Section 004: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9976) – Sophia Wilson
Section 005: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9977) – Melanie Hackney
Section 006: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9978) – Samantha Presnal
Section 007: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9979) – Janos Kun
Section 008: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9980) – Anna-Caroline Prost
Section 009: TWF, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9981) – Gabriella Lindsay

FREN-UA 10
Intensive Elementary French
(6 points)
Open to students with no previous training in French.  Completes the equivalent of a year's elementary level in one semester.

Silver 402
Section 001: MTWRF, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9982) – Bassem Shahin
Section 002: MTWRF, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9983) – Sophia Wilson
Section 003: MTWRF, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9984) – Fatiha Bali
Section 004: MTWRF, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#11142) – Jennifer Gordon

FREN-UA 11
Intermediate French I

Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's elementary level and to others on assignment by placement test.  Not equivalent to FREN-UA 20.  Only by following FREN-UA 11 with FREN-UA 12 can a student complete the equivalent of FREN-UA 20 and then continue on to the post-intermediate level.

GCASL 374
Section 001: MTR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9985) – Elena Aleksandrova
Section 002: MTR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9986) – Stéphanie Dubois
Section 003: MTR 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9987) – Samira Jafour
Section 004: MTR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9988) – Michelle Lanchart
Section 005: MTR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9989) – Samira Jafour
Section 006: MTR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#9990) – TBA

FREN-UA 12
Intermediate French II

Continuation of FREN-UA 11.  To fulfill the MAP requirement and continue on to the post-intermediate level, a student must complete both FREN-UA 11 and FREN-UA 12.  This two-semester sequence is equivalent to FREN-UA 20.

GCASL 274
Section 001: MTR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9991) – Johann Voulot
Section 002: MTR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9992) – Andy Dubrov
Section 003: MTR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9993 – Johann Voulot
Section 004: MTR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9994) – Nils Froment
Section 005: MTR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9995) – Samira Jafour
Section 006: MTR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9996) – Manoah Finston
Section 007: MTR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#9997) – TBA

FREN-UA 20
Intensive Intermediate French
(6 points)
Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's elementary level and to others on assignment by placement test.  Complete's the equivalent of a year's intermediate level in one semester.

Silver 406 (sec. 1 & 2), 506 (sec. 3 & 4)
Section 001: MTWRF, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9998) – Julie Hugonny
Section 002: MTWRF, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9999) – Mary Haslam
Section 003: MTWRF, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#10000) – Stéphanie Dubois
Section 004: MTWRF, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#10001) – Katie LaPorta

FREN-UA 30
Conversation & Composition

Systemizes and reinforces the language skills presented in earlier-level courses through an intensive review of grammar, written exercises, an introduction to composition, lexical enrichment, and spoken skills.

194 Mercer 303 (sec. 1 – 4, 6); Silver 512 (sec. 5)
Section 001: MWR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#10002) – Mary Haslam
Section 002: MWR, 9:30am -10:45am (#10003) – Aline Baehler
Section 003: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#10004) – Melanie Hackney
Section 004: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#10005) – Aline Baehler
Section 005: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#10006) – Jennifer Gordon
Section 006: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#10007) – Chris Bonner


ADVANCED LANGUAGE COURSES


FREN-UA 101
Spoken Contemporary French

Helps the student to develop vocabulary, improve pronunciation, and learn new idiomatic expressions.  Introduction to corrective phonetics and emphasis on understanding contemporary French through a study of such authentic documents as radio and television interviews, advertisements, and spontaneous oral productions.

Waverly 566B
Section 001: MTR, 9:30am – 10:45pm (#10008) – Nils Froment
Section 002: MTR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#10009) – Nils Froment
Section 003: MTR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#10010) – Olivier Berthe
Section 004: MTR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#10011) – Olivier Berthe

FREN-UA 103
French Phonetics

Jean-Philippe Graff
TR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm
Waverly 570
#10012
Ce cours est un cours de linguistique.  Dans ce cours, on parlera de la phonétique et de la prononciation.  Ce cours vous donnera l'occasion: (1) de mieux comprendre les systèmes phonologiques du français et de l'américain (oui, j’ai écrit l’américain!), (2) de découvrir et expliquer les problèmes typiques d'un anglophone américain qui apprend le français, (3) de découvrir et expliquer les problèmes typiques d’un francophone qui apprend l’américain, (4) de corriger ces mêmes problèmes (ce qu'on appelle «la phonétique corrective»), (5) d'améliorer votre prononciation du français et votre compréhension auditive, (6) de développer votre capacité de reconnaître vos propres erreurs et de les corriger, (7) d'apprendre l'alphabet phonétique international (API), qui vous sera un outil indispensable dans toutes vos études linguistiques, (8) de perfectionner votre façon d'expliquer un phénomène linguistique (ou n'importe quel autre phénomène) d'une façon nette et précise, (9) de maîtriser le vocabulaire linguistique en français et en anglais et (10) de mieux apprécier le français et votre(vos) propre(s) langue(s) maternelle(s).

FREN-UA 105
Written Contemporary French

Designed to improve the student's written French and to provide advanced training in French and comparative grammar.  Students are trained to express themselves in a variety of writing situations (for example, diaries, transcriptions, narrations, letters).  Focuses on the distinction between spoken and written styles and the problem of contrastive grammar.  Emphasis on accuracy and fluency of usage in the written language.

Silver 508 (sec. 1), 506 (sec. 2), 512 (sec. 3); 194 Mercer 303 (sec. 4); Waverly 570 (sec. 5)
Section 001: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#10013) – Melanie Hackney
Section 002: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#10014) – Aline Baehler
    (Section 002 is an advanced section)
Section 003: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#10015) – Anna-Caroline Prost
Section 004: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#10016) – Anna-Caroline Prost
Section 005: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#10017) – Pierre André

FREN-UA 107
Translation

Prof. Olivier Berthe
TR, 9:30am – 10:45am
Silver 500
#10018
Practice of translation through French and English texts taken from a variety of sources to present a range of contrasting grammatical and stylistic problems.  Also stresses acquisition of vocabulary.

FREN-UA 108
Advanced Techniques of Translation

Prof. Emmanuelle Ertel
W, 11:00am – 1:45pm
25 W. 4th St, room C-12
#22263
Course in translation method based on an intensive practice of translation.   Every week is devoted to a different genre of writing (such as poetry, prose, journalism, or subtitling) or a different set of issues related to translating (such as cultural, grammatical and sentential, phonic/graphic and prosodic, or language variety).

FREN-UA 110
Business French

Prof. Johann Voulot
TR, 9:30am – 10:45am
Silver 515
#10019
Designed for students who wish to learn the specialized language used in French business.  Emphasis on oral and written communication, as well as the acquisition of a business and commercial vocabulary dealing with the varied activities of a commercial firm (for example, advertising, transportation, banking).  Stresses group work in simulated business situations and exposure to authentic spoken materials.


CORE COURSES

(Conducted in French)

FREN-UA 120
Readings in French Literature I: Middle Ages and the Early Modern Era

Prof. Kathrina LaPorta
TR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm
Silver 510
#11148
Introduction to the central works in medieval and early modern French literature.  By analyzing plays, chronicles, poems, and novels, students explore the role and status of literature within the era's larger intellectual, political, and social framework.  Critical study of key themes, genres, and styles; focuses on analytical writing and literary analysis.  Authors studied may included Marie de France, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Montaigne, Corneille, Diderot, and Voltaire.

FREN-UA 121
Readings in French Literature II: The Modern Era (1789 – Present)

Prof. Emmanuelle Ertel
TR, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Silver 504
#10020
Introduction to central works in modern French literature.  By analyzing plays, chronicles, poems, and novels, students explore the role and status of literature within the era's larger intellectual, political, and social framework.  Critical study of key themes, genres, and styles; focuses on analytical writing and literary analysis.  Follows but does not require completion of Readings I.  Authors studied may include Colette, André Malraux, Céline, Simone de Beauvoir, Kateb Yacine, Georges Perec, and Marguerite Yourcenar.

FREN-UA 145
Approaches to Francophone Literature

Prof. J. Michael Dash
MW, 12:30pm - 1:45pm
Silver 500
#22205
The course examines the conceptualizing of Francophonie through the literature from a network of French-speaking countries which together form a Francophone space. It not only addresses the colonial past but the anti-colonial and postcolonial situations in which French colonialism is replaced by more complex relationships and ideologies. One of the most difficult issues that confronts the postcolonial francophone world is the question of cultural homogeneity and social integration within national structures. This course focuses on the problematic area of cultural transformation, language contact and the role of the writer in elaborating a post-colonial national identity. The problematizing of language, nation and writing will be examined in both a theoretical way and in the prose fiction of Maryse Conde of Guadeloupe, Jacques Roumain of Haiti, Sembene Ousmane of Senegal and Assia Djebar of Algeria.

FREN-UA 164
Contemporary France

Prof. Julie Hugonny
MW, 9:30am – 10:45am
Silver 500
#22207
An introduction to French history, politics, and social relations from 1900 to the present.  Attention is paid to the successive crises that challenged France's stature, its national identity, and its Republican model.  Topics include the French political and social systems; France's “exceptionalism” and relationships with Europe, the United States, and globalization; colonialism, immigration, and post-colonialism; and gender and class relations.

(Cross-listed as EURO-UA 288 and HIST-UA 169)



SENIOR SEMINARS

(conducted in French)
Permission of the department must be obtained to register for these courses.  Please contact Dain Goding for information on receiving a permission code.

FREN-UA 992.001
Les Femmes écrivains
Prof. Anne Deneys-Tunney
TR, 9:30am – 10:45am
Silver 518
#10025
Les femmes ont joué un rôle essentiel dans le développement de la littérature en France depuis ses origines. Jusqu'à présent souvent ignorées par les critiques, et mises à l'écart du corpus officiel de la littérature française, elles trouvent maintenant la place qui leur est due.  Depuis le 17 eme siècle jusqu'à aujourd'hui ce cours étudiera quelques une des figures majeures parmi les femmes écrivains. Nous réfléchirons aussi à la pertinence ou pas de cette catégorie des femmes écrivains. 
(Authors include Madame de la Fayette, Madame de Sévigné, Georges Sand, Colette, Duras, and de Beauvoir.)

FREN-UA 992.002
Espèces d'espaces
Prof. Phillip John Usher
MW, 4:55pm – 6:10pm
Silver 406
#10026
Le titre de ce cours est emprunté à un livre de Georges Pérec, publié en 1974, qui s’interroge sur le sens des « lieux » dans lesquels nous vivons (le lit, la chambre, l’appartement, l’immeuble, la rue, le quartier, la ville, etc.). Pérec démontre combien ces lieux que nous fréquentons, comme inconsciemment, sont aussi lisibles qu’un livre, combien ces lieux possèdent une logique et une syntaxe, combien ces lieux sont des « fictions » autant que des réalités. Emboîtant le pas à Pérec (que nous lirons) et nous inspirant également de certains autres penseurs du XXe siècle (Foucault, Certeau, Augé, Latour, etc.), nous voudrions donc réfléchir à la façon dont la littérature problématise notre relation aux « lieux », des plus intimes (le lit) aux plus abstraits (l’univers, l’ « anthropocène »). En privilégiant ces questions, nous prélèverons sur l’histoire de la littérature française des œuvres publiées depuis le Moyen Âge jusqu’au XXIe siècle. Auteurs probables (liste préliminaire) : Marie de France, Christine de Pisan, François Rabelais, Joachim du Bellay, Gilles Corrozet, Raymond Queneau, Eugène Ionesco, Michel Butor, Michel Foucault, Georges Pérec, Monique Wittig, Annie Ernaux, Michel Houellebecq.


FRENCH ELECTIVES


FREN-UA 965.001 (conducted in French)
Topics in French Literature: La Gloire et l'Horreur -- la Première Guerre Mondiale à travers la littérature et le cinéma
Profs. Ludovic Cortade and Claudie Bernard
TR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm
Waverly 570
#22191
La France commémore cette année le centenaire de la Première Guerre Mondiale. A cette occasion, ce cours propose aux étudiants d'étudier le regard que portent les romanciers et les cinéastes sur la guerre de 1914-1918.  Le cours porte sur l'étude de la langue, du contexte historique et du style des romanciers et des cinéastes, ainsi que sur leur vision des horreurs de la guerre, du courage et de la paix.  Le cours est co-enseigné par Prof. Cl. Bernard, spécialiste de littérature, et Prof. L. Cortade, spécialiste de cinéma.

FREN-UA 968.001 (conducted in French)
Topics in French Literature: Voix des banlieues

Prof. Emmanuelle Ertel
TR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm
Silver 406
#22193
Il s’agira dans ce cours avancé d’explorer les diverses formes d’expressions – voix multiples – issues des banlieues : romans, films, documents et documentaires, musique et poésie générés par les «cités» françaises. On suivra au cours du semestre un cadre chronologique qui s’étendra des lendemains de la guerre d’Algérie à nos jours et s’articulera autour de quelques grands thèmes comme la violence, l’école, la langue, racisme et intégration, engagement politique, etc.

FREN-UA 968.002 (conducted in French)
Topics in French Literature: La Littérature du voyage
Prof. Eugène Nicole
MW, 3:30pm – 4:45pm
Silver 406
#22194
Le voyage est l’un des grands thèmes de la littérature mondiale. Dans le domaine français, il a été pratiqué par Rabelais, Montaigne, Racine, Rousseau, Chateaubriand, Baudelaire, Gide, Michaux et de nombreux autres romanciers, philosophes, ethnologues et poètes.  Nous nous attacherons dans ce cours à illustrer cette variété. Privilégiant des oeuvres du XIXè et du XXè siècles, nous montrerons  qu’elles mettent alternativement l’accent sur l’expérience du voyageur, l’appel du Divers, la rencontre  avec l’Autre, l’exotisme et sa condamnation.

FREN-UA 868.001
(conducted in English)
Topics in French Literature: Acting Medieval Literature
Prof.  Evelyn Vitz
R, 9:30am – 12:15pm
GCASL 379
#22175
In this course students read, discuss, and then perform in class major works of medieval literature – works that were originally intended for live, semi-dramatic performance.  Focus is on narrative rather than dramatic works. The works explored vary from year to year, but always include epic, romance, tales of various kinds, and a range of narrative genres, from different countries and traditions. Students work particularly on the skills required for the performance of different kinds of narrative – including the ability to impersonate of all kinds of characters; rapid shifts from character to character, voice to voice; and effective use of body language, Most performances are done solo, but there is also some teamwork—performances in small groups. Students who can sing, dance, play an instrument, or have other performance skills are very welcome, but such skills are not necessary.  Work for the course consists of reading and classroom discussion; several short performances over the course of the semester; a final performance (often done in a group); short written responses to readings and “imaginary performances”; a final oral exam.  Note: This is a course where faithful attendance is an absolute must. Students who are not comfortable performing are strongly advised not to sign up for this course.
(Cross-listed as MEDI-UA 868, DRLIT-UA 35, and THEA-UT 732.002)
(French majors must fill out a French Coursework Guarantee in order to receive credit towards their major requirements for this course.)

FREN-UA 868.002 (conducted in English)
Topics in French Literature: An Introduction to Jacques Derrida (1930-2004)
Prof.  Lucien Nouis
MW, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Silver 500
#22176
From Derrida’s critique of “Western” categorizations of universality and rationality (logocentrism, phallogocentrism, humanism, anthropocentrism), to his later reflections on metaphoricity, translation, and performativity, this course will first explore the question of “writing” as it unfolds throughout the 1960’s and beyond. We will then focus on the more directly political and ethical dimension of Derrida’s thought, and carefully examine his use of concepts such as hos(ti)pitality, gift, forgiveness, animality, friendship, faith, and "événement," paying particular attention to his later conversation with Emmanuel Levinas. Readings will include passages, chapters and essays taken from Writing and Difference (1967), On Grammatology (1967), Psyche: Inventions of the Other (1987), Points..., (1992); Force of Law (1994); Politics of Friendship (1994); Monolinguism of the Other (1996); Of Hospitality (1997); On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness (1997); Philosophy in a Time of Terror (2003); The Beast and the Sovereign (2008), etc. The course and the readings will be in English.
(Cross-listed as COLIT-UA 723)
(French majors must fill out a French Coursework Guarantee in order to receive credit towards their major requirements for this course.)

FREN-UA 822
(conducted in English) – 2 points
Metaphors of Modern Theatre
Prof. Tom Bishop
T, 3:30pm – 4:45pm
194 Mercer 203
#22185
The first two weeks of the course will present an introduction touching on the history of modern drama, the socio-political context of the plays, the development of non-realistic theater as a reaction to realism, the philosophic tendencies toward the absurd. The remaining twelve weeks will deal with four plays. We will consider each of the four authors with respect to their work in general and their place in contemporary theater and the history of ideas. The plays will be analyzed in detail thematically and stylistically. Each will be seen as a highlight of anti-realistic dramaturgy, as a brilliant example of the sensibilities of European artists and thinkers in the periods following each of the two World Wars.

(Cross-listed as DRLIT-UA 267)

(This course is for 2 points and does not count toward the requirements for the French major or minor.)

FREN-UA 883 (conducted in English)
Cinema and Literature

Prof. William Wolf
W, 2:00pm – 4:45pm
Cantor 101
#10023
Exposes the student to various modes, such as expressionism, social realism, and the projection of the hero.  One film is viewed per week and analyzed with reading assignments that include novels, plays, and poems.  The objective is to exploit the potentiality of different media and to make vivid and intellectual the climate of Europe on which these media so often focus.
(Cross-listed as DRLIT-UA 504.001)
(Does not count towards the requirements for the French major or minor.)


OTHER

Permission of the department must be obtained to register for these courses.  Please contact Dain Goding for information on receiving a permission code.

FREN-UA 995
Honors Thesis Workshop II
(2 points)
Prof. Benoît Bolduc
F, 2:00pm – 4:45pm
19 University Place, room 605
#10027
Only for students who have also completed the fall section of the workshop.  For information on completing an honors thesis during your senior year, please speak to your adviser.

FREN-UA 998
Independent Study
(2 – 4 points)
#10028
Speak to your adviser for more information on completing an independent study.

FREN-UA 981
Internship (2 - 4 points)
#10024
Speak to your adviser for more information on completing an internship for credit.



PREVIOUS SEMESTERS:

FALL 2014
SPRING & SUMMER 2014
FALL 2013
SPRING & SUMMER 2013
FALL 2012
SPRING & SUMMER 2012
FALL 2011
SPRING 2011