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Upcoming Undergraduate Course Schedule & Descriptions


Click here for SUMMER 2015 course schedule and descriptions!


DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OFFERINGS

FALL 2015



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Language Courses
Advanced Language Courses
Core Courses
Senior Seminars
French Electives
Other



LANGUAGE COURSES

Information on placement into language courses can be found HERE.  In addition, CAS's schedule of exams are available HERE.

FREN-UA 1
Elementary French I

Open to students with no previous training in French.  Not equivalent to FREN-UA 10.  Only by following FREN-UA 1 with FREN-UA 2 can a student complete the equivalent of FREN-UA 10 and then continue on to the intermediate level.

25 W. 4th St., C-12; C-11 (sec. 3 only); C-7 (secs. 8 and 10); C-3 (sec. 11 only)
Section 001: MWR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#6825) – Maria Sanchez-Reyes
Section 002: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#6826) – Claire Reising
Section 003: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#6827) – TBA
Section 004: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#6828) – Fatiha Bali
Section 005: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#6829) – Fatiha Bali
Section 006: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#6830) – Jean-Pierre Graff
Section 007: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#6831) – Jeffrey Fuller
Section 008: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#6832) – Aileen Christensen
Section 009: MWR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#6833) – TBA
Section 010: TWF, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#6834) – Rachel Watson
Section 011: MTR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#8444) – TBA

FREN-UA 2
Elementary French II

Continuation of FREN-UA 1.  To continue on to the intermediate level, a student must complete both FREN-UA 1 and FREN-UA 2.  This two-semester sequence is equivalent to FREN-UA 10.

25 W. 4th St., C-15; C-11 (sec. 7 only)
Section 001: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#6835) – Masha Beliaeva
Section 002: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15am (#6836) – Jean-Pierre Graff
Section 003: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#6837) – Jean-Pierre Graff
Section 004: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#6838) – Nicolas Estournel
Section 005: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#6839) – TBA
Section 006: MWR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#6840) – Mimi Zhou
Section 007: TR, 2:00pm – 4:00pm (#16728) – Fatiha Bali
       Section 007 is exclusively for Tisch School of the Arts stduents and is only
       available to students who have received permission from the
       Department of French.


FREN-UA 10
Intensive Elementary French
(6 points)
Open to students with no previous training in French.  Completes the equivalent of a year's elementary level in one semester.

25 W. 4th St., C-7
Section 001: MTWRF, 8:00am – 9:15am (#6841) – TBA
Section 002: MTWRF, 9:30am – 10:45am (#6842) – TBA
Section 003: MTWRF, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#6843) – Stéphanie Dubois

FREN-UA 11
Intermediate French I

Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's elementary level and to others on assignment by placement test.  Not equivalent to FREN-UA 20.  Only by following FREN-UA 11 with FREN-UA 12 can a student complete the equivalent of FREN-UA 20 and then continue on to the post-intermediate level.

25 W. 4th St., C-16; C-18 (sec. 7 only)
Section 001: MTR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#6844) – TBA
Section 002: MTR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#6845) – Stéphanie Dubois
Section 003: MTR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#6846) – Samantha Presnal
Section 004: MTR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#6847) – Samira Ait-Jafour
Section 005: MTR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#6848) – Samira Ait-Jafour
Section 006: MTR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#6849) – Amelia Fedo
Section 007: TWF, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#6850) – TBA

FREN-UA 12
Intermediate French II

Continuation of FREN-UA 11.  To fulfill the MAP requirement and continue on to the post-intermediate level, a student must complete both FREN-UA 11 and FREN-UA 12.  This two-semester sequence is equivalent to FREN-UA 20.

25 W. 4th St., C-5
Section 001: MTR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#6851) – Johann Voulot
Section 002: MTR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#6852) – Kaliane Ung
Section 003: MTR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#6853) – Johann Voulot
Section 004: MTR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#6854) – TBA

Section 005: MTR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#6855) – TBA
Section 006: MTR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#6856) – Samira Ait-Jafour

Section 007: MTR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#6857) – Gabriella Lindsay

FREN-UA 20
Intensive Intermediate French
(6 points)
Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's elementary level and to others on assignment by placement test.  Complete's the equivalent of a year's intermediate level in one semester.

25 W. 4th St., C-19
Section 001: MTWRF, 8:00am – 9:15am (#6858) – TBA
Section 002: MTWRF, 9:30am – 10:45am (#6859) – Mary Haslam
Section 003: MTWRF, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#6860) – Melanie Hackney
Section 004: MTWRF, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#6861) – Jennifer Gordon

FREN-UA 30
Conversation & Composition

Systemizes and reinforces the language skills presented in earlier-level courses through an intensive review of grammar, written exercises, an introduction to composition, lexical enrichment, and spoken skills.

Section 001: MWR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#6862) – TBA
Section 002: MWR, 9:30am -10:45am (#6863) – Aline Baehler
Section 003: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#6864) – Mary Haslam
Section 004: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#6865) – Aline Baehler
Section 005: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#6866) – TBA
Section 006: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#6867) – Anna-Caroline Prost
Section 007: MWR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#6868) – Anna-Caroline Prost


ADVANCED LANGUAGE COURSES


FREN-UA 101
Spoken Contemporary French

Helps the student to develop vocabulary, improve pronunciation, and learn new idiomatic expressions.  Introduction to corrective phonetics and emphasis on understanding contemporary French through a study of such authentic documents as radio and television interviews, advertisements, and spontaneous oral productions.

25 W. 4th St., C-3
Section 001: MTR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#6869) – Nils Froment
Section 002: MTR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#6870) – Nils Froment
Section 003: MTR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#6871) – Olivier Berthe
Section 004: MTR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#6872) – Olivier Berthe

FREN-UA 103
French Phonetics

John Moran
TR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm
25 W. 4th St., C-10
#7959
Ce cours est un cours de linguistique.  Dans ce cours, on parlera de la phonétique et de la prononciation.  Ce cours vous donnera l'occasion: (1) de mieux comprendre les systèmes phonologiques du français et de l'américain (oui, j’ai écrit l’américain!), (2) de découvrir et expliquer les problèmes typiques d'un anglophone américain qui apprend le français, (3) de découvrir et expliquer les problèmes typiques d’un francophone qui apprend l’américain, (4) de corriger ces mêmes problèmes (ce qu'on appelle «la phonétique corrective»), (5) d'améliorer votre prononciation du français et votre compréhension auditive, (6) de développer votre capacité de reconnaître vos propres erreurs et de les corriger, (7) d'apprendre l'alphabet phonétique international (API), qui vous sera un outil indispensable dans toutes vos études linguistiques, (8) de perfectionner votre façon d'expliquer un phénomène linguistique (ou n'importe quel autre phénomène) d'une façon nette et précise, (9) de maîtriser le vocabulaire linguistique en français et en anglais et (10) de mieux apprécier le français et votre(vos) propre(s) langue(s) maternelle(s).

FREN-UA 105
Written Contemporary French

Designed to improve the student's written French and to provide advanced training in French and comparative grammar.  Students are trained to express themselves in a variety of writing situations (for example, diaries, transcriptions, narrations, letters).  Focuses on the distinction between spoken and written styles and the problem of contrastive grammar.  Emphasis on accuracy and fluency of usage in the written language.

25 W. 4th St., C-9; C-11 (sec. 3 only)
Section 001: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#6873) – TBA
Section 002: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#6874) – Aline Baehler
       (Section 002 is an advanced section)
Section 003: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#6875) – TBA
Section 004: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#6876) – Jennifer Gordon
Section 005: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#6877) – Anna-Caroline Prost

FREN-UA 107
Translation

Emmanuelle Ertel
MW, 9:30am – 10:45am
25 W. 4th St., C-1
#6878
Practice of translation through French and English texts taken from a variety of sources to present a range of contrasting grammatical and stylistic problems.  Also stresses acquisition of vocabulary.

FREN-UA 109
Acting French
Melanie Hackney
MW, 9:30am – 10:45am
25 W. 4th St., C-10
#6879
This course is both a literature course that will allow you to study important French drama and a language course that will help you progress in French, especially in your oral expression. During the semester, we will traverse the centuries of French theater, lingering on certain authors and representative works. We will attempt to perform scenes for the pleasure of both the eyes and the ears. During this course, you will have regular phonetic exercises, you will read and study theater, you will give expository presentations on authors and contexts and you will memorize and recite/perform poems and scenes -- you will sometimes even write your own!

FREN-UA 110
Business French

Prof. Johann Voulot
TR, 9:30am – 10:45am
25 W. 4th St., C-4
#7626
Designed for students who wish to learn the specialized language used in French business.  Emphasis on oral and written communication, as well as the acquisition of a business and commercial vocabulary dealing with the varied activities of a commercial firm (for example, advertising, transportation, banking).  Stresses group work in simulated business situations and exposure to authentic spoken materials.


CORE COURSES

(Conducted in French)

FREN-UA 120
Readings in French Literature I: Middle Ages and the Early Modern Era

Prof. Henriette Goldwyn
TR, 11:00am – 12:15pm
25 W. 4th St., C-4
#6880
Introduction to the central works in medieval and early modern French literature.  By analyzing plays, chronicles, poems, and novels, students explore the role and status of literature within the era's larger intellectual, political, and social framework.  Critical study of key themes, genres, and styles; focuses on analytical writing and literary analysis.  Authors studied may included Marie de France, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Montaigne, Corneille, Diderot, and Voltaire.

FREN-UA 121
Readings in French Literature II: The Modern Era (1789 – Present)

Prof. Ludovic Cortade
TR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm
25 W. 4th St., C-4
#7960
Introduction to central works in modern French literature.  By analyzing plays, chronicles, poems, and novels, students explore the role and status of literature within the era's larger intellectual, political, and social framework.  Critical study of key themes, genres, and styles; focuses on analytical writing and literary analysis.  Follows but does not require completion of Readings I.  Authors studied may include Colette, André Malraux, Céline, Simone de Beauvoir, Kateb Yacine, Georges Perec, and Marguerite Yourcenar.

FREN-UA 163
French Society and Culture

Prof. Stéphane Gerson
TR, 3:30pm - 4:45pm
25 W. 4th St., C-$
#8249
Retrospective and introspective view of French civilization from the early period to 1900 through the interrelation of history, literature, fine arts, music, and philosophy.  Study of major historical forces, ideas, and tensions; the formation of collective identities (territorial, religious, political, and so on); France's diversity and formative conflicts; the Republican model; France and the other world; and the relationship between state, nation, and citizenry.  Primary sources and documents such as chroniques, mémoires, journaux, revues, and correspondances.

FREN-UA 164
Contemporary France

Prof. Nils Froment
TR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm
Silver 404
#8728
An introduction to French history, politics, and social relations from 1900 to the present.  Attention is paid to the successive crises that challenged France's stature, its national identity, and its Republican model.  Topics include the French political and social systems; France's “exceptionalism” and relationships with Europe, the United States, and globalization; colonialism, immigration, and post-colonialism; and gender and class relations.

(Cross-listed as EURO-UA 288 and HIST-UA 169)



SENIOR SEMINARS

(conducted in French)
Permission of the department must be obtained to register for these courses.  Please contact Dain Goding for information on receiving a permission code.

FREN-UA 991.001
Espèces d'espaces
Prof. Phillip John Usher
MW, 11:00am – 12:15pm
25 W. 4th St., C-18
#6883
Le titre de ce cours est emprunté à un livre de Georges Pérec, publié en 1974, qui s’interroge sur le sens des « lieux » dans lesquels nous vivons (le lit, la chambre, l’appartement, l’immeuble, la rue, le quartier, la ville, etc.). Pérec démontre combien ces lieux que nous fréquentons, comme inconsciemment, sont aussi lisibles qu’un livre, combien ces lieux possèdent une logique et une syntaxe, combien ces lieux sont des « fictions » autant que des réalités. Emboîtant le pas à Pérec (que nous lirons) et nous inspirant également de certains autres penseurs du XXe siècle (Foucault, Certeau, Augé, Latour, etc.), nous voudrions donc réfléchir à la façon dont la littérature problématise notre relation aux « lieux », des plus intimes (le lit) aux plus abstraits (l’univers, l’ « anthropocène »). En privilégiant ces questions, nous prélèverons sur l’histoire de la littérature française des œuvres publiées depuis le Moyen Âge jusqu’au XXIe siècle. Auteurs probables (liste préliminaire) : Marie de France, Christine de Pisan, François Rabelais, Joachim du Bellay, Gilles Corrozet, Raymond Queneau, Eugène Ionesco, Michel Butor, Michel Foucault, Georges Pérec, Monique Wittig, Annie Ernaux, Michel Houellebecq.

FREN-UA 991.002
La Politique des Images en France
Prof. Ludovic Cortade
TR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm
194 Mercer, 208
#6884
Ce séminaire, spécialement destiné aux étudiants «Senior», offre une méthode pour comprendre l’importance et l’omniprésence des images dans notre civilisation, et plus particulièrement, en France.   Nous essaierons de comprendre les enjeux politiques des images, leur dimension idéologique et l’influence qu’elles exercent sur notre vie quotidienne.   Les discussions et les exposés ont pour objectif d’offrir aux étudiants de larges opportunités de s’exprimer et de se situer en tant que citoyens libres de leurs opinions.  Thèmes et questions abordés dans ce cours inclurent: L’iconographie des hommes politiques, les rapports entre la politique et l’humour au cinéma, l’influence des images sur la perception du corps, de la sexualité et du genre, la publicité et la société de consommation, la représentation de l’environnement, et la question de la liberté d’expression et de la censure.



FRENCH ELECTIVES


FREN-UA 935 (conducted in French)
Women Writers in France
Prof. Laura Hughes
MW, 9:30am – 10:45am
25 W. 4th St., C-4
#16734
Il s'agira, à travers les siècles et cinq romans de femme aux styles divers, de voir sous quels traits semble s'esquisser une écriture féminine. L'analyse portera tant sur les thèmes et les personnages que sur l'organisation du texte et les problèmes de la narration, le point du vue, l'expression du temps et de l'espace, sans oublier une certaine forme de recontextualisation historique.

FREN-UA 965 (conducted in French)
Topics in French Literature: Slavery in the Francophone World

Prof. Cécile Bishop
MW, 3:30pm – 4:45pm
25 W. 4th St., C-19
#8726
Between the seventeenth and the nineteenth century, France was responsible for the kidnapping, forced transport and brutal enslavement of over a million Africans. This course examines representations of slavery in a wide range of media including literature, film and visual arts, from the late 18th century to the present day. In addition to exploring the role of slavery in shaping French and francophone cultures, students will develop new perspectives on the power and limits of literature and art in representing violence and suffering. Authors studied include Madame de Staël, Claire de Duras, Prosper Mérimée, Maryse Condé, André Schwarz-Bart and Patrick Chamoiseau.

FREN-UA 865
(conducted in English)
Topics in French Culture: Paris in History, Art and Literature
Prof. Olivier Berthe
MW, 4:55pm – 6:10pm
25 W. 4th St., C-9
#8267
The aim of this course is to help the student develop an intimate knowledge of France’s capital city. Adopting a chronological approach, we will explore the different stages of Paris’ development through the analysis of numerous historical and literary texts, maps, paintings, photographs and movies. In the process, we will journey through over 2000 years of French history, discovering major political, social and artistic events, and developing a vision of the organic growth of the city.
(French majors must fill out a French Coursework Guarantee in order to receive credit towards their major requirements for this course.)

FREN-UA 883 (conducted in English)
Cinema and Literature

Prof. William Wolf
W, 2:00pm – 4:45pm
Cantor 101
#6881
Exposes the student to various modes, such as expressionism, social realism, and the projection of the hero.  One film is viewed per week and analyzed with reading assignments that include novels, plays, and poems.  The objective is to exploit the potentiality of different media and to make vivid and intellectual the climate of Europe on which these media so often focus.
(Cross-listed as DRLIT-UA 504.001)
(Does not count towards the requirements for the French major or minor.)


OTHER

Permission of the department must be obtained to register for these courses.  Please contact Dain Goding for information on receiving a permission code.

FREN-UA 995
Honors Thesis Workshop I
(2 points)
Prof. Claudie Bernard
T, 3:30pm – 6:10pm
19 University Place, room 605
#6885
Only for students who have applied to the honors program and also intend to complete the spring section of the workshop.  For information on completing an honors thesis during your senior year, please speak to your adviser.

FREN-UA 997
Independent Study
(2 – 4 points)
#6886
Speak to your adviser for more information on completing an independent study.

FREN-UA 980
Internship (2 - 4 points)
#6882
Speak to your adviser for more information on completing an internship for credit.



PREVIOUS SEMESTERS:

SPRING & SUMMER 2015
FALL 2014
SPRING & SUMMER 2014
FALL 2013
SPRING & SUMMER 2013
FALL 2012
SPRING & SUMMER 2012
FALL 2011
SPRING 2011