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Upcoming Undergraduate Course Schedule & Descriptions


DEPARTMENT OF FRENCH

UNDERGRADUATE COURSE OFFERINGS

FALL 2014


(Click HERE for Summer 2014 course schedule and descriptions!)


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Language Courses
Advanced Language Courses
Core Courses
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LANGUAGE COURSES

Information on placement into language courses can be found HERE.  In addition, CAS's schedule of exams are available HERE.

FREN-UA 1
Elementary French I

Open to students with no previous training in French.  Not equivalent to FREN-UA 10.  Only by following FREN-UA 1 with FREN-UA 2 can a student complete the equivalent of FREN-UA 10 and then continue on to the intermediate level.

Silver Center 402 (sec. 1), 508 (sec. 2), 515 (sec. 3); Waverly Building 370 (sec. 4), 566B (secs. 5 & 7), 194 Mercer 201 (secs. 6, 8, & 9), 209 (sec. 10); Tisch Hall LC6 (sec. 11)
Section 001: MWR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9691) -- Delphine Stafford
Section 002: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9692) -- Camilo Frias
Section 003: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9693) -- Gabriella Lindsay
Section 004: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9694) -- Masha Beliaeva
Section 005: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9695) -- Sam Presnal
Section 006: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9696) -- Sophia Wilson
Section 007: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9697) -- Delphine Stafford
Section 008: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9698) -- Jean-Phillipe Graff
Section 009: MWR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#9699) -- Jean-Phillipe Graff
Section 010: TWF, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9700) -- Janos Kun
Section 011: MTR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#11953) -- Lauren Weaver


FREN-UA 2
Elementary French II

Continuation of FREN-UA 1.  To continue on to the intermediate level, a student must complete both FREN-UA 1 and FREN-UA 2.  This two-semester sequence is equivalent to FREN-UA 10.

Silver 518 (sec. 1); 194 Mercer 202 (sec. 2), 207 (secs. 3 - 6)
Section 001: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9701) -- Kaliane Ung
Section 002: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15am (#9702) -- Amelia Fedo
Section 003: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9703) -- Manoah Finston
Section 004: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9704) -- Fatiha Bali
Section 005: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9705) -- Sophia Wilson
Section 006: MWR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#9706) -- Michelle Lanchart

FREN-UA 10
Intensive Elementary French
(6 points)
Open to students with no previous training in French.  Completes the equivalent of a year's elementary level in one semester.

Waverly Building 566B

Section 001: MTWRF, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9707) -- Kathrina LaPorta
Section 002: MTWRF, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9708) -- Fatiha Bali
Section 003: MTWRF, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9709) -- Melanie Hackney


FREN-UA 11
Intermediate French I

Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's elementary level and to others on assignment by placement test.  Not equivalent to FREN-UA 20.  Only by following FREN-UA 11 with FREN-UA 12 can a student complete the equivalent of FREN-UA 20 and then continue on to the post-intermediate level.

Tisch Hall LC6 (sec. 1), LC3 (sec. 2); Silver 501 (sec. 3), 500 (secs. 4 & 6), 518 (sec. 5);
194 Mercer 206 (sec. 7)
Section 001: MTR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9710) -- Pierre André
Section 002: MTR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9711) -- Downing Bray
Section 003: MTR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9712) -- Joe Johnson
Section 004: MTR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9713) -- Elena Aleksandrova
Section 005: MTR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9714) -- Samira Jafour
Section 006: MTR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9715) -- Emily Price
Section 007: TWF, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9716) -- Renee Kimble

FREN-UA 12
Intermediate French II

Continuation of FREN-UA 11.  To fulfill the MAP requirement and continue on to the post-intermediate level, a student must complete both FREN-UA 11 and FREN-UA 12.  This two-semester sequence is equivalent to FREN-UA 20.

Tisch Hall LC3 (sec. 1); Silver 500 (sec. 2), 514 (sec. 3), 515 (sec. 4), 508 (sec. 6);
Waverly 567 (sec. 5); 25 W. 4th C-16 (sec. 7)
Section 001: MTR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9717) -- Johann Voulot
Section 002: MTR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9718) -- Nils Froment
Section 003: MTR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9719) -- Johann Voulot
Section 004: MTR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9720) -- Jean-Philippe Graff
Section 005: MTR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9721) -- Tina Montenegro
Section 006: MTR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9722) -- Jean-Philippe Graff
Section 007: MTR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#9723) -- Olivier Berthe

FREN-UA 20
Intensive Intermediate French
(6 points)
Open to students who have completed the equivalent of a year's elementary level and to others on assignment by placement test.  Complete's the equivalent of a year's intermediate level in one semester.

Silver 404 (secs. 1 – 3); Waverly 566B (sec. 4)
Section 001: MTWRF, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9724) -- Julie Hugonny
Section 002: MTWRF, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9725) -- Mary Haslam
Section 003: MTWRF, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9726) -- Stéphanie Dubois
Section 004: MTWRF, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9726) -- Jennifer Gordon

FREN-UA 30
Conversation & Composition

Systemizes and reinforces the language skills presented in earlier-level courses through an intensive review of grammar, written exercises, an introduction to composition, lexical enrichment, and spoken skills.

Silver 506 (sec. 1), 514 (sec. 2); Waverly 567 (sec. 3); 194 Mercer 201 (sec. 4), 308 (sec. 5), 
210 (sec. 6 & 7)
Section 001: MWR, 8:00am – 9:15am (#9728) -- Mary Haslam
Section 002: MWR, 9:30am -10:45am (#9729) -- Andy Dubrov
Section 003: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9730) -- Kathrina LaPorta
Section 004: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9731) -- Chris Bonner
Section 005: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9732) -- Aline Baehler
Section 006: MWR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9733) -- Jennifer Gordon
Section 007: MWR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm (#9734) -- Sophia Wilson


ADVANCED LANGUAGE COURSES


FREN-UA 101
Spoken Contemporary French

Helps the student to develop vocabulary, improve pronunciation, and learn new idiomatic expressions.  Introduction to corrective phonetics and emphasis on understanding contemporary French through a study of such authentic documents as radio and television interviews, advertisements, and spontaneous oral productions.

Silver 409 (sec. 1), 508 (sec. 2), 514 (sec. 3), 518 (sec. 4)
Section 001: MTR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9735) -- Nils Froment
Section 002: MTR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9736) -- Nils Froment
Section 003: MTR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9737) -- Olivier Berthe
Section 004: MTR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm (#9738) -- Olivier Berthe

FREN-UA 103
French Phonetics

Jean-Philippe Graff
TR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm
Silver 500
#11032
Ce cours est un cours de linguistique.  Dans ce cours, on parlera de la phonétique et de la prononciation.  Ce cours vous donnera l'occasion: (1) de mieux comprendre les systèmes phonologiques du français et de l'américain (oui, j’ai écrit l’américain!), (2) de découvrir et expliquer les problèmes typiques d'un anglophone américain qui apprend le français, (3) de découvrir et expliquer les problèmes typiques d’un francophone qui apprend l’américain, (4) de corriger ces mêmes problèmes (ce qu'on appelle «la phonétique corrective»), (5) d'améliorer votre prononciation du français et votre compréhension auditive, (6) de développer votre capacité de reconnaître vos propres erreurs et de les corriger, (7) d'apprendre l'alphabet phonétique international (API), qui vous sera un outil indispensable dans toutes vos études linguistiques, (8) de perfectionner votre façon d'expliquer un phénomène linguistique (ou n'importe quel autre phénomène) d'une façon nette et précise, (9) de maîtriser le vocabulaire linguistique en français et en anglais et (10) de mieux apprécier le français et votre(vos) propre(s) langue(s) maternelle(s).

FREN-UA 105
Written Contemporary French

Designed to improve the student's written French and to provide advanced training in French and comparative grammar.  Students are trained to express themselves in a variety of writing situations (for example, diaries, transcriptions, narrations, letters).  Focuses on the distinction between spoken and written styles and the problem of contrastive grammar.  Emphasis on accuracy and fluency of usage in the written language.

Silver 501 (sec. 1); Waverly 569 (sec. 2), 570 (sec. 3); 194 Mercer 303 (sec. 3), 301 (sec. 5)
Section 001: MWR, 9:30am – 10:45am (#9739) -- Melanie Hackney
Section 002: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9740) -- Aline Baehler
    (Section 002 is an advanced section)
Section 003: MWR, 11:00am – 12:15pm (#9741) -- Anna-Caroline Prost
Section 004: MWR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm (#9742) -- Anna-Caroline Prost
Section 005: MWR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm (#9743) -- Julie Hugonny

FREN-UA 107
Translation

Emmanuelle Ertel
MW, 9:30am – 10:45am
#9744
Practice of translation through French and English texts taken from a variety of sources to present a range of contrasting grammatical and stylistic problems.  Also stresses acquisition of vocabulary.

FREN-UA 109
Acting French

Anna-Caroline Prost
MW, 9:30am – 10:45am
19 West 4th St., room 102
#9745
This course is both a literature course that will allow you to study important French drama and a language course that will help you progress in French, especially in your oral expression. During the semester, we will traverse the centuries of French theater, lingering on certain authors and representative works. We will attempt to perform scenes for the pleasure of both the eyes and the ears. During this course, you will have regular phonetic exercises, you will read and study theater, you will give expository presentations on authors and contexts and you will memorize and recite/perform poems and scenes -- you will sometimes even write your own!

FREN-UA 110
Business French

Johann Voulot
TR, 9:30am – 10:45am
#10579
Designed for students who wish to learn the specialized language used in French business.  Emphasis on oral and written communication, as well as the acquisition of a business and commercial vocabulary dealing with the varied activities of a commercial firm (for example, advertising, transportation, banking).  Stresses group work in simulated business situations and exposure to authentic spoken materials.


CORE COURSES

(Conducted in French)

FREN-UA 120
Readings in French Literature I: Middle Ages and the Early Modern Era

Prof. Benoît Bolduc
TR, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Weinstein SB20
#9746
Introduction to the central works in medieval and early modern French literature.  By analyzing plays, chronicles, poems, and novels, students explore the role and status of literature within the era's larger intellectual, political, and social framework.  Critical study of key themes, genres, and styles; focuses on analytical writing and literary analysis.  Authors studied may included Marie de France, Rabelais, Marguerite de Navarre, Montaigne, Corneille, Diderot, and Voltaire.

FREN-UA 121
Readings in French Literature II: The Modern Era (1789 – Present)

Prof. Ludovic Cortade
TR, 3:30pm – 4:45pm
Tisch Hall LC5
#11033
Introduction to central works in modern French literature.  By analyzing plays, chronicles, poems, and novels, students explore the role and status of literature within the era's larger intellectual, political, and social framework.  Critical study of key themes, genres, and styles; focuses on analytical writing and literary analysis.  Follows but does not require completion of Readings I.  Authors studied may include Colette, André Malraux, Céline, Simone de Beauvoir, Kateb Yacine, Georges Perec, and Marguerite Yourcenar.

FREN-UA 163
French Society and Culture

Prof. Phillip Usher
TR, 4:55pm – 6:10pm
194 Mercer 301
#11551
Retrospective and introspective view of French civilization from the early period to 1900 through the interrelation of history, literature, fine arts, music, and philosophy.  Study of major historical forces, ideas, and tensions; the formation of collective identities (territorial, religious, political, and so on); France's diversity and formative conflicts; the Republican model; France and the other world; and the relationship between state, nation, and citizenry.  Primary sources and documents such as chroniques, mémoires, journaux, revues, and correspondances.

FREN-UA 164
Contemporary France

Stella Vincenot
MW, 4:55pm – 6:10pm
Goddard Hall B01
#18099
An introduction to French history, politics, and social relations from 1900 to the present.  Attention is paid to the successive crises that challenged France's stature, its national identity, and its Republican model.  Topics include the French political and social systems; France's “exceptionalism” and relationships with Europe, the United States, and globalization; colonialism, immigration, and post-colonialism; and gender and class relations.

(Cross-listed as EURO-UA 288 and HIST-UA 169)



SENIOR SEMINARS

(conducted in French)
Permission of the department must be obtained to register for these courses.  Please contact Dain Goding for information on receiving a permission code.

FREN-UA 991.001
Proust
Prof. Eugène Nicole
MW, 3:30pm – 4:45pm
#9750
Throughout close readings of Du côté de chez Swann, À l’Ombre des jeunes filles en fleurs and Le temps retrouvé, this seminar will examine the philosophical roots of Proust’s aesthetics and his conception of Time as the very substance of human experience. We will study the great novels' recurrent themes, their stylistic traits and organizing structures. We will show that Proust’s most powerful innovation resides in his conception of the novel as an instrument in the search for Truth.

FREN-UA 991.002
Masculin/Féminin
Prof. Anne Deneys-Tunney
MW, 9:30am – 10:45am
#9751
Y a t il une différence entre la représentation de la différence des sexes, ou leur construction? A partir de l'oeuvre fondatrice de Simone de Beauvoir, le Deuxième Sexe, et des questions actuelles sur le "gender" ou le genre, nous étudierons des oeuvres essentielles de la littérature française où cette question du rapport et de la différence (voire de la guerre) entre l'homme et la femme est mise en scène.


FRENCH ELECTIVES


FREN-UA 562 (conducted in French)
Les Philosophes
Prof. Lucien Nouis
MW, 11:00am – 12:15pm
Bobst 737
#18094
Les philosophes de la deuxième moitié du xxe siècle n’ont pas cessé d’interroger les Lumières, que ce soit pour montrer qu’elles ont conduit au totalitarisme (Adorno), que les «grands récits» ou fictions qu’elles proposaient (le progrès, l’émancipation, la liberté) sont désormais bien dépassés (Lyotard) ou encore, de manière plus positive, que leur héritage demande à être exploré, prolongé ou récupéré (Habermas, Derrida). Le but de ce cours sera de donner une vue d’ensemble des problèmes soulevés par les Lumières, tout en resituant ces idées à partir des préoccupations de «notre» modernité.

FREN-UA 865 (conducted in English)
Topics in French Culture: Haiti -- History, Society and Culture
Prof. J. Michael Dash
TR, 2:00pm – 3:15pm
Silver 508
#11594
The past two hundred years have taken Haiti from pariah state to failed state. Haiti is loved or despised because it is seen as absolutely different. Haiti is indeed different but its difference is historical and not inherent. Its revolutionary origins so challenged the prejudices of its time that Haiti has been conspicuously consigned to the margins of modern history. This course is an introduction to key issues in Haitian society, history and culture and provides an overview of the political changes that have made a relatively isolated, national culture increasingly diasporic and transnational.
(Cross-listed as SCA-UA 742)
(French majors must fill out a French Coursework Guarantee in order to receive credit towards their major requirements for this course.)

FREN-UA 965 (conducted in French)
Topics in French Culture: La France à travers ses régions – littérature, historie et gastronomie
Prof. Ludovic Cortade
TR, 12:30pm – 1:45pm
194 Mercer 307
#18090
Ce cours a pour objectif de présenter la France dans la diversité de ses régions. Trois aspects seront privilégiés: le rapport des écrivains à leur région d'origine, la diversité de la gastronomie et l'histoire inscrite dans les paysages de la France. Nous étudierons des textes littéraires et historiques, des guides touristiques, des films, des cartes postales... et des recettes de cuisine qui mettent en valeur la beauté et le patrimoine des régions françaises. Parmi les régions étudiées: le Val de Loire et ses châteaux, la Bretagne, les montagnes des Alpes et des Pyrénées, les vignobles, la Côte d'Azur, l'Alsace, etc.

FREN-UA 883 (conducted in English)
Cinema and Literature

Prof. William Wolf
W, 2:00pm – 4:45pm
Cantor 101
#9748
Exposes the student to various modes, such as expressionism, social realism, and the projection of the hero.  One film is viewed per week and analyzed with reading assignments that include novels, plays, and poems.  The objective is to exploit the potentiality of different media and to make vivid and intellectual the climate of Europe on which these media so often focus.
(Cross-listed as DRLIT-UA 504.001)
(Does not count towards the requirements for the French major or minor.)

CROSS-LISTED COURSES


FREN-UA 868.002 (discussion conducted in English)
Topics in French Literature: Arthur Rimbaud
Prof. Kristin Ross
T, 11:00am – 1:00pm
19 University Place, room 305
#19847
A seminar sponsored by the Department of Comparative Literature devoted to the poetry, cultural, and political context of Arthur Rimbaud. Students must have some reading knowledge of French (there will surely be differing levels of familiarity with French in the group) and a good French dictionary.
(French majors must fill out a French Coursework Guarantee in order to receive credit towards their major requirements for this course.)

FREN-UA 868.003 (course sponsored by the Medieval & Renaissance Center)
Topics in French Literature: The Image and Role of Gawain in Medieval Arthurian Romance
Prof. Jessica Quinlan
TR 2:05pm – 3:15pm
244 Greene St., room 306
#23890
We may know him as Gauvain, Gawan, Gawain, Walewein or Calvano; the brave and gallant nephew of King Arthur is a constant in Arthurian romance throughout Medieval Europe. In the verse tradition, Gawain is immediately recognizable by virtue of his loyalty to the needs of the Arthurian court and an endearing weakness for the fair sex. He is also often associated with a certain reluctance to engage in adventure, however, a quality undoubtedly linked to his role in the earlier romances as second fiddle to a hero who will ultimately succeed in transcending the Arthurian realm. These fundamental traits give rise to deliberation regarding the concept of the perfect knight and to no end of comic variation on the fate of the eternal bachelor, but they also prompt narrative experimentation on the profile and tasks of the primary hero – a series of considerations which could perhaps be said to culminate in the Middle English Sir Gawain and the Green Knight with the question of the role of human weakness as a constitutive feature of heroism. All the while, however, the prose tradition develops the flower of chivalric perfection in a completely different direction, exasperating Gawain’s limitations to the point of depicting him as a ruthlessly vengeful knight who willfully abandons Christian morals. The primary reading for this course will draw on a number of literary traditions to trace the development of a character central to Arthurian romance from a pan-European perspective.
(Does not count towards the requirements for the French major or minor.)



OTHER

Permission of the department must be obtained to register for these courses.  Please contact Dain Goding for information on receiving a permission code.

FREN-UA 995
Honors Thesis Workshop I
(2 points)
Prof. Benoît Bolduc
F, 2:00pm – 4:45pm
Bobst 837
#9752
Only for students who have applied to the honors program and also intend to complete the spring section of the workshop.  For information on completing an honors thesis during your senior year, please speak to your adviser.

FREN-UA 997
Independent Study
(2 – 4 points)
#9753
Speak to your adviser for more information on completing an independent study.

FREN-UA 980
Internship (2 - 4 points)
#9749
Speak to your adviser for more information on completing an internship for credit.



PREVIOUS SEMESTERS:

SPRING & SUMMER 2014
FALL 2013
SPRING & SUMMER 2013
FALL 2012
SPRING & SUMMER 2012
FALL 2011
SPRING 2011